Atomic Bomb Dome (A-bomb Dome)

What to see around the Atomic Bomb Dome

The Peace Memorial Park is located in Naka Ward, Hiroshima City, between the two rivers of Ota and Motoyasu. In addition to the Atomic Bomb Dome, a UNESCO World Heritage site, the park is also home to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and many other facilities, memorials, bronze statues, and so on that pass on the tragic experiences of the atomic bombing to future generations.

Atomic Bomb Dome (A-bomb Dome)

In December 1996 at UNESCO's 20th World Heritage Committee Convention in Merida, the Atomic Bomb Dome was listed as a World Heritage site being a building that communicates the total devastation caused by nuclear weapons. Designated Site:The area on which the Atomic Bomb Dome is situated: Approx. 0.39 hectare

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Peace Bell

This peace bell was built in 1964 by the A-bomb Survivor Hiroshima Hope Fruition Society as a symbol for a spiritual and cultural movement that aims at the creation of a world without nuclear weapons and wars. On the surface of the bell, which was made by late Masahiko Katori (a Living National Treasure), a world map without national boundaries, symbolizing "one world," is embossed.

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Children's Peace Monument

This monument was dedicated on Children's Day, 1958, to Sadako Sasaki, who was exposed to the atomic bombing when she was 2 years old. She developed leukemia ten years later and passed away. Shocked by her death, her classmates put out a national call to "build a monument to mourn all the children who died from the atomic bombing." With the support of students in more than 3,100 schools throughout Japan and nine other countries, including Great Britain, this 9 m-high bronze statue was completed.

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Flame of Peace

The Flame of Peace was designed by Kenzo Tange, then professor at the University of Tokyo in 1964. The pedestal expresses the shape of two hands pressed together at the wrist and bent back so that the palms open up toward the sky, a design which is to console the souls of victims who craved water, and wish for nuclear abolition and everlasting world peace.

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Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum is the largest of Hiroshima's sites related to the atomic bomb. Designed by renowned architect Tange Kenzo (1913-2005), the museum opened in 1955, and in 2006 it was designated an Important Cultural Property of Japan. The museum consists of two adjacent buildings inside Peace Memorial Park. The main hall houses an extensive collection of artifacts from the time of the bombing, while the east building is focused on peace education through a variety of media.

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Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims

Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims opened in August, 2002, to mourn the lives lost in the atomic bombing and pray for everlasting peace as a country. It aims to deepen the understanding of people around the world of the tragedy caused by the atomic bomb, and to hand down Hiroshima's experience of the A-bombing to future generations.

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Atomic Bomb Dome (A-bomb Dome)

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